Database Server Provisioning: Partitions & Logical Drives

People overlook the importance of coming up with the right number and correct combination of storage partitions when setting up SQL Server server. More often, people just create partitions equal to the number of disks or arrays they have on the server. For example:

Array 1, Raid 1, Disks 1-2, Partition 1 – Drive C: (OS)
Array 2, Raid 1, Disks 3-4, Partition 2 – Drive D: (Data)
Array 3, Raid 1, Disks 5-6, Partition 3 – Drive E: (Log)
Array 4, Raid 1, Disks 7-8, Partition 4 – Drive F: (TempDB)

This works perfectly however if you are lucky enough to have a server capable of having the right amount of partitions that would host your intended files. But most of us live in the world where funds are scarce that we have to deal with limited amount of resources like server hard drives.

So if you are one of those who weren’t lucky enough to be given the right amount of funds for the right amount of server hard drives, creating storage partitions like as if you have the right amount of hard drives will save you some future work when you finally had your server with the right amount of hard drives.

For example, if you only have 2 drives, configured as RAID 1, instead of just creating a single partition (drive C:) to house every file you have in the server, you may want to create the partitions  in a manner that would mimic your best/ideal configuration even though you have a limited amount of resource underneath. For example:

Array 1, Raid 1, Disks 1-2, Partition 1 – Drive C: (OS)
Array 1, Raid 1, Disks 1-2, Partition 2 – Drive D: (Data)
Array 1, Raid 1, Disks 1-2, Partition 3 – Drive E: (Log)
Array 1, Raid 1, Disks 1-2, Partition 4 – Drive F: (TempDB)

When bosses grant your wishes to have the server configuration you desire, rest assured that you will have lesser tweaks to do when migrating to the newer server. For example, on the newer server, you will have the following:

Array 1, Raid 1, Disks 1-2, Partition 1 – Drive C: (OS)
Array 2, Raid 1+0, Disks 3-8, Partition 2 – Drive D: (Data)
Array 3, Raid 1+0, Disks 9-12, Partition 3 – Drive E: (Log)
Array 4, Raid 1+0, Disks 13-16, Partition 4 – Drive F: (TempDB)

By pre-configuring your servers with the ideal amount of partitions regardless of the underlying number of physical drives / arrays, you simply just restore a database backup on the new server and this saves you from reconfiguring file locations to take advantage of what is in the new server.

Caution: The examples above aren’t suggestive of best practice in terms of server/database performance but are mere simple examples to drive a point. Your ideal partition configuration may be more exotic or elaborate than the samples presented as based from your unique circumstances.

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IMG_5960
Philipine Duck, Anas luzonica (endemic)
Photographed in Candaba, Pampanga

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Toto Gamboa is a consultant specializing on databases, Microsoft SQL Server and software development operating in the Philippines. He is currently a member and one of the leaders of Philippine SQL Server Users Group, a Professional Association for SQL Server (PASS) chapter and is one of Microsoft’s MVP for SQL Server in the Philippines. You may reach him by sending an email to totogamboa@gmail.com

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